Outcomes, Debates, Concerns

"Equal Rights: A Debate," New York Times, 1944

When an anti-discrimination amendment was proposed for the Constitution on the basis of sex, the debate of women's equality began to stir; the New York Times published a Q&A with two committeewomen asking their views on the debate, as to whether women are equal and whether they should be.

The debate of whether women were, are, and should be equal is posed somewhere in the world, every day.  During World War II, with more women in the workforce and military than ever before, the question of equal rights had a constant ebb and flow throughout the media.  Although the country was well aware of women's worth during this time, debates and concerns rode simultaneously alongside, continously questioning women's capabilities and motivations.

With downsides came upsides, as well; despite the circulations of concerns regarding women during WWII, women continued to push forward.  By the end of the war, women had proven their importance as crucial to the war effort, which also came with it positive outcomes that would shift the trajectory of female stereotypes in the United States for years to come.

Outcomes, Debates, Concerns